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Is it possible, in this day and age, for a North American city at the heart of a metro area with a million-and-a-half population, to still be walkable and have a transit ridership share of almost one-quarter of all peak-time trips? And is it realistic for such a city to aim for a 50% non-car mode share by the mid-2030’s?

The Canadian capital city, Ottawa, has managed to maintain itself as a truly pleasant walking city in part because of its growing ability to mind the small scale in addition to the large scale. In the last decade or so, it has made some interesting strides in the way it combines planning regulation with enhancement of the public realm. This series of blogs will outline some examples of what Ottawa has been doing.

3.        Contextual infill and new housing forms

Every city has its share of megaprojects, tall buildings, major redevelopments, sports complexes, arts centres, flashy condo towers and starchitect-designed office buildings. But does every city have the sensitivity of the human scale, the feel for the fine-grained detail of its public realm, the attention to small things that add up to pleasant, livable urban environments?

Every city has its share of megaprojects, tall buildings, major redevelopments, sports complexes, arts centres, flashy condo towers and starchitect-designed office buildings. But does every city have the sensitivity of the human scale, the feel for the fine-grained detail of its public realm, the attention to small things that add up to pleasant, livable urban environments?

This is the sixth blog on issues to be addressed at the 55th International Making Cities Livable Conference, May 14-18, 2018, in Ottawa. To improve neighborhood health we need to use the most effective tools for the task. Here are some of the tools that have been succcessfully used, that will be discussed at the conference.

This is the fifth blog on issues to be addressed at the 55th International Making Cities Livable Conference, May 14-18, 2018, in Ottawa. Significant improvements to neighborhood health require strategies to muster public will and mobilize resources. Here are a few of the effective strategies that will be shared at the Conference.

This is the fourth blog on issues to be addressed at the 55th International Making Cities Livable Conference, May 14-18, 2018, in Ottawa. As our cities grow, we face many challenges in how to roll with the punch - to transform what seems like a negative challenge into a positive gain. At this conference we will hear many stories about how cities are determined to create a humane and livable urban environment while handling rapid growth and economic and ecological threats.

This is the third blog on issues to be addressed at the 55th International Making Cities Livable Conference, May 14-18, 2018, in Ottawa.

Barcelona's density of 16,000 inhabitants per square kilometer is one of the highest in Europe. In many neighborhoods around La Sagrada Familia the density is higher than 50,000 per square kilometer. This density is achieved thanks to the six-story mixed-use grid plan urban fabric laid out by Cerda in the 19th century. 

This is the second blog on issues to be addressed at the 55th International Making Cities Livable Conference, May 14-18, 2018, in Ottawa.

Many of the world’s cities are growing rapidly. But HOW should we grow? Should we grow vertically? Should we grow horizontally? Or should we search for the missing sweet spot in the middle? How are cities around the world accommodating growth? And which approach offers the best solutions?

Part One - Defining Principles

Around the world cities are growing rapidly. Some are spreading horizontally, some are reaching for the sky, and others are searching for the sweet spot in the middle. Which approach offers the best solutions?

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